Third Journal of Polymer Science Innovation Award – call for nominations

The Journal of Polymer Science is proud to announce the call for nominations for the third year of its international award. The Journal of Polymer Science Innovation Award recognizes significant research innovation and achievement in a polymer scientist under 40. The award consists of a symposium in association with the Polymeric Materials: Science and Engineering (PMSE) Division of the ACS and a dinner in recognition of the recipient at the ACS Fall meeting, a $5000 prize, and travel expenses of up to $1000 to the ACS Fall meeting for the award year. Nominations for the prize should consist of a one-page document from the nominator in support of the nominee, explaining why the innovative nature of their research deserves recognition, and an up-to-date CV from the nominee. Please send nominations to jpschem@wiley.com or jpsphys@wiley.com before January 24th, 2014.

2012 Impact Factors announced

The Journal of Polymer Science: Polymer Physics impact factor increased by 45% this year to 2.221!

Editor’s choice papers: June 2013

Enjoy free access to our editor’s choice papers for a limited time:

  • Liquid Crystal Functionalization of Electrospun Polymer Fibers” by Jan Lagerwall and colleagues (http://bit.ly/131RiAw).

Electrospinning is a convenient way of functionalizing polymer fibers with liquid crystals, and thereby introduce responsivity. In this Perspective, Jan Lagerwall and colleagues look at the future for this new class of composites with potential applications such as wearable technologies, sensors, actuators, and fiber-integrated photonics.

 

  • Thermally Induced Shape-Memory Effects in Polymers: Quantification and Related Modeling Approaches” by Andreas Lendlein and colleagues (http://bit.ly/18JOvjK).

 Shape-memory polymers that can exhibit a controlled shape change in a predefined way are finding use in areas such as biomedicine. Andreas Lendlein and colleagues review the modeling methods that are being used to study and develop these materials, often helping to translate fundamental research into technological applications.

 

  • Effect of Thermal History on the Ionic Conductivity of Block Copolymer Electrolytes”by Nitash Balsara and colleagues(http://bit.ly/11n3XjA).

 Balsara and colleagues study the effects of thermal history on the ionic conductivity of both cylindrical and lamella block copolymer electrolytes, and find that the molecular weight of the polymer affects the changes in conductivity. The results are explained in terms of the connectivity and composition of the conducting phase.

 

  •  Effect of trans- and cis-Isomeric Defects on the Localization of the Charged Excitations in π-Conjugated Organic Polymers” by Sergei Tretiak and colleagues (http://bit.ly/ZoSYp1).

Tretiak and colleagues study the structure—property relationships in conjugated polymers, revealing correlations between polymer defect structure and both charge transport and photophysical properties.

Most downloaded paper of the year - so far!

Check out our most-downloaded paper of the year for free at http://bit.ly/XBDcTn

Graphene/polymer composites have wide potential applications in energy related systems, especially for fabricating flexible devices. The polymer component can improve the processability and/or flexibility of graphene materials, as well as provide them with new functions. Yiqing Sun and Gaoquan Shi review recent achievements in the synthesis and applications of graphene/polymer composites for use in supercapacitors, lithium ion batteries, solar cells, fuel cells and more.

Upcoming conference: Physical Aspects of Polymer Science

The 26th meeting of the UK Polymer Physics Group (PPG) will be held at the University of Sheffield, between the 9th and 11th of September, 2013. The meeting “provides an opportunity for researchers from both academia and industry to discuss the latest innovations in understanding and manipulating the physical behaviour of a wide range of polymeric systems.” More details are available at the conference website: http://paps13.iopconfs.org/Home

New review series on techniques on polymer science

We are delighted to bring you free access to all the Reviews and Perspectives in our new series on techniques in polymer science. Whether you need to know a method to study interfaces (http://bit.ly/12PHnPr), the best way to use neutrons to study soft materials (http://bit.ly/12P3jdo), or how to measure charge-carrier mobility in organic semiconductors (http://bit.ly/156qCDS), this series will grow to provide you with basic understanding and new insights from experts. Take a look at the articles so far here: http://bit.ly/17tB0oH, and check back to see what we’ll be covering next.

The beautiful cover image that accompanies the highly-downloaded Review article from Aftin Ross and Joerg Lahann on “Surface engineering the cellular microenvironment via patterning and gradients”, free to download at http://bit.ly/ZPb1Ac. The image shows an electron micrograph of a PLGA fiber scaffold that has been seeded with fibroblasts (false-colored). A number of cells can bridge the micrometer-scale gap between fiber rails. As outlined in the Review, this type of control over three-dimensional scaffold microstructure is one of the important design criteria for scaffolds, in addition to material choice, ligand presentation, and the like (image credit: T. Eyster and J. Jordahl).

The beautiful cover image that accompanies the highly-downloaded Review article from Aftin Ross and Joerg Lahann on Surface engineering the cellular microenvironment via patterning and gradients”, free to download at http://bit.ly/ZPb1Ac. The image shows an electron micrograph of a PLGA fiber scaffold that has been seeded with fibroblasts (false-colored). A number of cells can bridge the micrometer-scale gap between fiber rails. As outlined in the Review, this type of control over three-dimensional scaffold microstructure is one of the important design criteria for scaffolds, in addition to material choice, ligand presentation, and the like (image credit: T. Eyster and J. Jordahl).

Free access to the Young Investigators special issue

We are delighted to bring you free access to all papers in the latest special focus issue in the Journal of Polymer Science: Polymer Physics, guest edited by Profs. Thomas Epps, III and Mahesh Mahanthappa. This issue highlights rising stars in the polymer community through a series of feature articles and full papers. Use this link to read cutting edge work from fundamentals to applications on topics ranging from protein polymer physics, adaptable polymer composites and thin film patterning to computation and theory, stimuli-responsive polymers and energy applications: http://bit.ly/WehQ3Q

Editor’s choice papers for December

Enjoy free access to the brightest and best physics of polymers via this month’s editor’s choice papers:

 

Polypyrrole Stretchable Actuators”, byGeoffrey Spinks, Gordon Wallace and colleagues (http://bit.ly/TbrmQT).

 

Spinks, Wallace and colleagues report a simple way to prepare stretchable polypyrrole-based actuator materials that can be operated over a wide dynamic strain range and generate useable actuation displacements and pressures.

 

Advances in Square Arrays Through Self-Assembly and Directed Self-Assembly of Block Copolymers”, by Christopher Hardy and Chuanbing Tang (http://bit.ly/X3aCfW).

 

The electronics industry has high hopes for using block copolymers as masks and templates to create circuits at a scale currently impossible lithographically, but the industry currently revolves around square-based geometries; by contrast, hexagonal patterns are far easier to obtain in block copolymers. Chuanbing Tang and Christopher Hardy review advances in approaches to achieve commercially relevant square arrays.

 

Slow geminate-charge-pair recombination dynamics at polymer:fullerene heterojunctions in efficient organic solar cells”, by Mario Leclerc, Saif A. Haque, Carlos Silva and colleagues (http://bit.ly/PMMopR).

 

Carlos Silva and colleagues use combined time-resolved photoluminescence and transient absorption spectroscopies to look at charge-recombination dynamics at electron donor—acceptor heterojunctions in polymer—fullerene solar cells. For the system studied, delayed photoluminescence is attributed to slow generation of charge-transfer excitons via tunneling from deeply trapped geminate polaron pairs. It is estimated that 16% of geminate recombination at room temperature originates from this slow mechanism.

 

Structure Formation of Integral-Asymmetric Membranes of Polystyrene-block-Poly(ethylene oxide)”, by Volker Abetz and colleagues (http://bit.ly/VN3u9q).

 

Volker Abetz and colleagues combine the advantages of the self-assembly of polystyrene-block-poly(ethylene oxide) with a conventional phase-inversion process to obtain a membrane with an isoporous top layer and sponge-like structure beneath from this polymer for the first time. Poly(ethylene oxide) prevents membrane biofouling and is biocompatible, giving these membranes high potential for medical and biotechnological applications.

 

 

Quantifying the Elasticity and Viscosity of Geometrically Confined Polymer Films via Thermal Wrinkling”, by Edwin Chan, Qinghuang Lin and Christopher Stafford (http://bit.ly/RXGMsa).

 

Edwin Chan, Qinghuang Lin and Christopher Stafford use thermal wrinkling to study the elasticity and viscosity of chemically crosslinked polymer systems. They find that that the rate of change of the wrinkling wavelength with annealing time and temperature has unique relationships with the elasticity and viscosity of the polymer network.

Special issue on Polymer Electronics

Guest edited by Thomas Russell and Dhandapani Venkataraman from UMass Amherst, this special issue takes an in-depth look at the hot topic of polymer solar cells. With Reviews and Perspectives from leaders in the field, such as Yuping Lu, Howard Katz, Russell Gaudiana and the guest editors themselves, all aspects of polymer solar cells, transistors and characterization are covered. Enjoy FREE access to all these papers for an overview of the current state-of-the-art. Click here to read the table of contents and download the Reviews.